Final-Index-Html-Screenshot

Screenshot of final index html codes

 

Screenshot-For-Final-Resume-Html

Final screenshot of resume html codes

 

Screenshot-For-Final-Resume-Html

 

Final css stylesheet screen shot

 

 

As a senior Writing Arts major at Rowan University, I have grown used to having my ideas of what constitutes or defines writing challenged. By this point, I can certainly say that writing is a lot more than just words on paper. However, I still never really thought about writing in the form of codes until the responsive resume/personal statement in XHTML and CSS. I’ve always been interested in coding/html and thought of it as a fun hobby, but to me web design was for well, web designers, not writers. 

However, to be a writer you have to do more than just write these days. This is a point I made in my personal statement and strive to live by. If you want to be a successful writer, you need to learn how to do it all. Companies would rather hire a writer that can code then have to hire a writer and a web designer. By learning to code your own website in addition to writing your own web content, you will be able to stand out from other applications. 

Writing for the web and writing in code is a lot of fun, but certainly challenging. In other forms of writing such as creative writing, you have to pay close attention to details. Details tell the reader everything about characters, what they should think, feel, and how they should react to the written text. This is no different in the world of coding. While it is advisable to stay simple especially on a beginning level, details are still everything. They can make the difference between having a website that is in compliance with XHTML/CSS guidelines and one that is not. They can also tell the user what to think, feel, and how to react. For a portfolio website like the one I have just created, you want to make sure your details tell potential employers that you are experienced, professional, successful, and responsible. In order to do this having a page that looks clean, is easy to read, and has neutral, positive colors (blue is an example of this as it often envokes feelings of calamity and peacefulness). Websites that look sloppy and have dark, dismal colors (or ones that are too bright) may give off the wrong impression that a potential employee is clumsy, careless, or too negative. 

I’ve always considered myself to be a writer of many genres and I am excited about adding web design coding to the long list of genres that I can specialize in. I believe I have made good progress with expanding my knowledge of XHTML and CSS through this project and I look forward to advancing my skills throughout the rest of the semester. 

Front-Page-Of-Final-Website

Final version of website’s main page

 

Final-Resume-Page-Of-Website

Final version of website’s resume page

 

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